Are K-12 Students Hurt by Computers in Schools?

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found in a recent world wide study that heavy use of computers in K-12 schools does not necessarily improve student results. In fact, the study found that students who spend above-average amounts of time using computers in class perform worse on written and digital reading tests than those who use computers for below-average amounts of time.

Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s education director, stated: “School systems need to find more effective ways to integrate technology into teaching and learning to provide educators with learning environments that support 21st century pedagogies and provide children with the 21st century skills they need to succeed in tomorrow’s world. Technology is the only way to dramatically expand access to knowledge.”

Among the chief complaints in the OECD report is that students tend to get “lost” online when completing reading and writing assignments.

This is where Merit comes in.

Merit reading and writing programs control the navigation experience. In Merit writing programs, for example, students are guided step-by-step while they work. Progress at various stages of development is automatically tracked in an easy-to-use tool for students and instructors.

Read the OECD report: Students, Computers and Learning: Making the Connection

Merit’s Writing Programs with free trial links:

Merit’s New UI Changes

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Merit is pleased to announce the recent rollout of several user interface changes to its online learning platform.

Among the changes are: a flexible design, based on the dimensions of the users screen display; larger font sizes; and crisper, clearer buttons.

The new look may be seen by trying any full-working demo from a Merit program’s web page.