AA053438The transition to the Common Core has been controversial and poorly handled, particularly when it comes to teacher evaluations and new standardized tests.

However, the harsh reality is that reading scores in the U.S. have not improved in 20 years.

The Common Core is more rigorous than previous curriculum standards in almost every state. Writing instruction, which had been typically skimpy, has a large role in the Common Core.

Using established, seasoned teaching methods like Merit’s online Punch writing programs is one of the keys to success for almost every school.

Merit’s Punch writing programs have a strong track record of improving student writing skills. Paragraph Punch, the first Merit Punch writing program, was launched in 1993. It has been updated, and upgraded, several times since its inception.

The Punch writing programs guide pupils through the writing process, providing hints and tips at every step of the way. Students of a wide range of abilities within an individual class may use the software.

Student writing is automatically stored in a convenient Online Portfolio. Teachers are easily able to view written work at different stages of development.

Click here to learn more about Merit’s Punch writing programs.

Category:
classroom technology, college preparation, edtech, english language learning, improving teacher quality, increasing student achievement, special education, standards based curriculum
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  1. “The Common Core is more rigorous than previous curriculum standards. Writing instruction, which was all but ignored, has a large role in the Common Core.”

    These are sweeping statements. Which previous curriculum standards are you referring to? Some states had rigorous standards and traded them in for the weaker Common Core Standards.

  2. We were referring to a 2009 speech where Secretary Duncan accused states of setting the bar too low in order to comply with the regulations of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. “We want to raise the bar dramatically in terms of higher standards. What we have had as a country, I’m convinced, is what we call a race to the bottom. We have 50 different standards, 50 different goal posts. And due to political pressure, those have been dumbed down. We want to fundamentally reverse that. We want common, career-ready internationally benchmarked standards,” said Duncan.

    http://www.ed.gov/blog/2009/06/excepts-from-secretary-arne-duncan%E2%80%99s-remarks-at-the-national-press-club/

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